Education in Tamilnadu

The main entrance of IIT Madras, showing its logo and its motto. Tamil Nadu has performed reasonably well in terms of literacy growth during the decade 1991-2001. The state's literacy rate increased from 62.66% in 1991 to 73.47% in 2001. which is above the national average. A survey conducted by the Industry body Assocham ranks Tamil Nadu top among Indian states with about 100% Gross Enrollment Ratio (GER) in primary and upper primary education.

Tamil Nadu has 19 universities, 250 engineering colleges and 1150 arts college, 2550 schools and 5000 hospitals.[citation needed] Some of the reputed institutes include University of Madras, IIT Madras, Anna University, NIT Tiruchi, Madras Medical College and Tamil Nadu Agricultural University. Tamil Nadu produces the highest number of engineering graduates in India (around 30,000) every year which attracts many software companies to set up their shop in south India.


Chennai IIT Main Gate

India has a human development index calculated as 0.619, while the corresponding figure for Tamil Nadu is 0.736, placing it among the top states in the country. The life expectancy at birth for males is 65.2 years and for females it is 67.6 years. However, it has a number of challenges, significantly, the poverty is high, especially in the rural areas. As of 2004-2005, the poverty line was set at Rs. 351.86/month for rural areas and Rs. 547.42/month for urban areas. Poverty in the state dropped from 51.7% in 1983 to 21.1% in 2001 For the period 2004-2005, the Trend in Incidence of Poverty in the state was 22.5% compared with the national figure of 27.5%. The World Bank is currently assisting the state in reducing poverty High drop-out and low completion of secondary schools continue to hinder the quality of training in the population. Other problems include class, gender, inter-district and urban-rural disparities.

The Dravidian movement, which championed the causes of educating the people and eradicating superstitions, began in Tamil Nadu. In addition, it aimes to uplift the socially repressed Dravidian people and drew considerable support from the middle classes for their efforts in this matter. The movement was committed to social justice which led to the expansion of reservations for the deprived communities. Tamil Nadu now has a 69% reservation in educational institutions, the highest among all Indian states.

The Mid-day Meal Scheme program in Tamil Nadu, initiated by Kamaraj, was expanded considerably during the rule of the AIADMK in 1983. It feeds over a fifth of the state's population.[citation needed] Despite this, the state is among the 12 states in India that have alarming level of hunger according to the 2008 Global Hunger Index.

Tamil Nadu Board of Secondary Education, established in 1910, is under the purview of the Department of Education, Governemnt of Tamil Nadu, India. Up to and ending at the secondary (class 10) level, the following streams of education are offered: the SSLC (Secondary School Leaving Certificate) stream, the Anglo-Indian stream, the Oriental School Leaving Certificate (OSLC) stream and the Matriculation stream. And for higher secondary (classes 11 and 12) there is single unified stream leading to the award of the Higher Secondary Certificate (HSC). The Tamil Nadu State Board of School Examination evaluates students' progress by conducting two board examinations-one at the end of class 10 and the other at the end of class 12. The scores from the class 12 board examinations are used by universities to determine eligibility and as a cut-off for admissions into their programmes.

The jurisdiction of the board extends to schools located in the state of Tamil Nadu. Schools can choose to affiliate themselves to the Tamil Nadu Board of Secondary Education or to other boards-the CBSE or the ICSE-that are authorized to conduct secondary (class 10) and higher secondary (class 12) final examinations and award certificates to successful candidates.

H.S.S. Lawrence is regarded in TamilNadu to be the Architect of Higher Secondary Education in TamilNadu. As Special Officer for restructuring Educational Pattern in TamilNadu and as Director of School Education, Dr. Lawrence planned and implemented the All India 10+2+3 pattern of education in 1978.